Friday, February 12, 2016

New support group help parents of kids with brain tumors and injuries



Parents of kids with brain tumors and injuries have a new resource: CoxHealth’s Pediatric Brain Tumor and Injury Connection, a monthly gathering that offers a safe environment to share emotional support.


"Raising a child with brain tumors and trauma is a difficult road, but it’s even more difficult when it’s done alone," says Lana Martin, Pediatric Trauma Coordinator at CoxHealth. "This monthly group is a new resource for those who wish to connect and learn with one another."


The group is open to caregivers and survivors up to 15 years of age, as well as survivors’ siblings. It will be guided by leaders who are dedicated to the care and assistance of children and their family members, such as Child Life team members and pediatric registered nurses. The agenda and occasional guest speakers will be determined by the group’s participants.


Besides emotional support, the group offers interpersonal contact, an opportunity to share similar experiences (helping members feel less isolated), a chance to learn about the achievements of others who overcame similar difficulties, confidence building, safety discussions and play-therapy for the children.


The group meets on the second Saturday of each month from 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. at Cox South. An RSVP is required to attend. For more information or to RSVP, call 417-269-0923.

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Cox College sees record Spring enrollment for 2016


Cox College’s steady growth is proven by the numbers: 877 students are currently enrolled, making this semester the largest Spring semester in the college’s history.   


“We are thrilled that more and more students are choosing Cox College to advance their careers,” says Dr. Jim Moore, vice president of College Services Institutional Research for Cox College. “Students know that when they come to Cox College, they are supported by a faculty and staff focused on their success, and that they’ll graduate with a quality education.” 


Cox College expects to see continued, sustained growth in the upcoming years, especially in light of the current shortage of healthcare professionals. It’s growth that benefits the local community: Most of the college’s graduates stay within southwest Missouri after completing their studies.


Cox College was established in 1907 as Burge School of Nursing. Today, the private college offers a variety of associate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Nursing, Nutrition Diagnostics, Occupational Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, Radiography and Medical Assisting, as well as certificates in Medical Billing and Coding.

 

What to eat, what to avoid: CoxHealth endocrinologist discusses new dietary guidelines




In early January, new dietary guidelines were released. The guidelines are aimed at helping Americans improve their eating habits, reduce obesity and prevent chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

CoxHealth Endocrinologist Dr. James Bonucchi explained that in the past, the dietary guidelines emphasized a low-fat diet.

“What we’ve learn through more recent research is perhaps the low fat diet is not the ideal diet,” Dr. Bonucchi explains. “When you start to eliminate fats in your diet, the fats are often replaced with carbohydrates, whether it is simple sugars, such as candy, sodas and sweet teas, or even more complex sugars, such as a potato. The extra sugar in the diet, complex carbs included, have a big detriment on the body overall. Those carbohydrates end up leading to more obesity based on what we believe with current research, which ultimately relates to more diabetes.”

Dr. Bonucchi said 20 years ago, the obesity rate in the U.S. was only 10 to 15 percent. Today,  in Missouri, the obesity rate is now one in three adults, according to 2014 numbers and no state has an obesity rate less than 20 percent.

What’s to blame?

Dr. Bonucchi explained there are a couple of things believed to be contributing to the growing obesity problem – less active lifestyles and the foods being consumed today.

“It is not just about the calories consumed, but what makes up those calories, is what really plays into it,” he says.  “A lot of it also likely has to do with convenience foods. The average kitchen has shrunk in size in new houses. People are eating out, ordering in and getting take out. They are not spending time in their kitchen cooking from scratch the way our grandmothers did. When our grandmother made something, she knew every ingredient she put in there. With processed foods, we don’t know what foods we are putting in our bodies.”

When purchasing food, Dr. Bonucchi suggests purchasing items with no more than five ingredients listed on the label, if possible.

“Also, if you can’t pronounce an ingredient, you probably shouldn’t be buying it,” he said. 

Stick to a healthy eating pattern, not a diet
“You should really stick to a healthy eating pattern and not to a diet,” Dr. Bonucchi said. “Diets don’t work because diet implies it is short term. We are talking about healthy eating, something you are doing consistently, every single day. That healthy eating pattern should include a healthy, rich mixture of different vegetables including leafy, dark greens, as well as greens, reds and oranges.  All of those different fruits and vegetables are different colors for a reason because there are different nutrients in each one. Also, don’t forget about beans. Beans are very healthy and a great source of both protein and fiber.”



Selective with starches

“Some starchy vegetables are OK, if you are eating them whole,” Dr. Bonucchi says. “We are often told to avoid corn, but corn still has good nutrition in it, as long as it is not ground up into a corn tortilla. It is also OK to have a potato occasionally, as long as it is not the giant baked potato. If you have a baked potato, have a small baked potato that will fit in your hand and make sure you are eating the skin because that is where you find the good nutrients.”

Go for whole grains

“It is OK to have some carbohydrates, especially if they are in the form of whole grains because the body can handle whole grains over a longer period of time,” he says. “Whole grains are less refined and so the body is able to handle it more slowly and it allows your body to absorb the food in your body over a longer period of time, which is especially important for those who have diabetes. The key to whole grains is avoiding white. If it looks like it has little nuts and seeds in it, that is perfect.”

Add fish to your diet

“Don’t forget about seafood,” Dr. Bonucchi said. “We probably don’t eat enough seafood in this country. You should be having a serving of ocean fish at least once a week, not deep fried and battered, but baked or grilled. Also, go for lean meats, poultry, chicken, eggs, beans and soy.”

What to limit

“We should consume no more than 10 percent of our daily calories from added sugars,” explains Dr. Bonucchi. “We are not talking about sugars that naturally occur in fruit. Those don’t count because they are buried in that whole piece of fruit or corn. It is the sugars that are added to our diet that we really must limit to 10 percent of our calories. If the average person is on a 2,000 calorie diet, they should limit their intake to 50 grams of sugar. That is equivalent to about one can of regular soda or one glass of sweet tea. Also, be aware of hidden sugars, such as sugars added to salad dressings and sauces.”

The new guidelines also recommend limiting  sodium to 2,300 mg per day.

“The average American is consuming 4,000 mg each day,” Dr. Bonucchi said. “If you are going out to eat, you can easily get 2,000 mg of sodium in one appetizer, let alone the entire meal. Most processed food items are filled with sodium, including your frozen TV dinners. Sodium is an excellent preservative but the tradeoff is we are getting a lot of sodium in our diet from processed foods.”

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Germ-zapping robot newest addition to CoxHealth’s defense against infections


Hard-to-kill germs, lurking in hard-to-clean places, have a new enemy at CoxHealth: A robot that uses use Full-Spectrum™ pulsed xenon ultraviolet (UV) light to quickly destroy harmful bacteria, viruses, fungi and bacterial spores.


“We want to do everything within our means to provide a clean environment at our facilities to reduce the risk of hospital acquired infections,” says Cindy Robertson, Infection Prevention Director at CoxHealth.
“This investment in a Xenex system underscores our commitment to patient care and the communities we serve.” 


The portable disinfection system is effective against even the most dangerous pathogens, including Clostridium difficile (C. diff), norovirus, influenza, Ebola and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA.


The portable Xenex system can disinfect a typical patient or procedure room in five minute cycles without warm-up or cool-down times. It can be used in any department and in any unit within a healthcare facility, including isolation rooms, operating rooms, general patient care rooms, contact precaution areas, emergency rooms, bathrooms and public spaces.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Cox Branson names Simon Wajnblom vice president of performance management



 
Simon Wajnblom will serve as  vice president of performance management for Cox Branson.

Simon Wajnblom has been named Cox Medical Center Branson’s vice president of performance management. As vice president of performance management, Wajnblom will be responsible for driving performance based on data, working on strategic planning, and ensuring that Cox Branson fulfills its mission to provide exceptional health care throughout Taney and Stone counties.

 

“Simon is a proven leader who has incredible drive and a great passion for the healthcare industry,” says Cox Branson President William Mahoney. “We believe Simon is going to play an integral role in helping Cox Branson develop best practice standards that will ensure that we are providing the best care for our patients today and for many years to come.”

 

Wajnblom has been a part of the CoxHealth team for more than 10 years. He began his career with CoxHealth as business manager of surgical services. During his time as business manager of surgical services, Wajnblom successfully introduced new service lines and procedures as well as served as project lead for new surgery center construction and implementation.

 

In 2009, Wajnblom was promoted to the position of director of supply chain, purchasing and contracting. In that role, Wajnblom developed, implemented and oversaw supply chain support and logistics for CoxHealth’s multi-facility system. Wajnblom also played an essential role in helping to manage capital equipment and supplies for new construction projects at Cox South, including the emergency room, orthopedic surgery center, outpatient surgery center and intensive care unit.  

 

Wajnblom was born in Malmo, Sweden, and moved to the U.S. in 1999 to attend Drury where he was a part of the swim team. He has an undergraduate degree in Business Administration and a master’s degree in business management and strategy.

 

“I am very excited about the opportunity to become part of the Branson community where family and community values are strong,” Wajnblom says. “My passion and drive in health care ties directly in to my passion for community. I’m eager to begin building relationships in the community and learning how we can make health care better for the people who live, work and visit Branson.”

Meet the employees who quit tobacco with Charlie's Fund

Since its founding three years ago, Charlie’s Fund at CoxHealth has been helping staff members break the tobacco habit. The fund offers a $1,000 incentive for participating employees who remain tobacco-free for a year.

In 2015, eight of our colleagues rose to the challenge and earned the incentive award. CoxHealth President and CEO Steve Edwards recognized the staff members during the monthly Department Head meeting at Cox South. The 2015 participants are:

Rhonda Shafer, Patient Access, Cox Branson
James Bosserman, Materials Management, Cox Branson
Lisa Potthoff, Ferrell-Duncan Clinic Neurology
Rozlyn McTeer, Trauma Services
Sabrina Wollweber, Physicians Billing
Stephanie Barnes, Oxford
Rick Boaz, Pre-Hospital Services
Tina Buffington, Oxford HealthCare (not pictured)

Please join us in congratulating them on their achievement!

Enrollment is underway now for employees who are working to be tobacco-free in 2016. Enrollment runs from January 18 – 28 for this year’s program that begins February 1. CoxHealth employees can visit the intranet to see a list of details on how to participate.

Meet Your Trainer: Nate Manus



Nate Manus is a fitness assistant and personal trainer at CoxHealth Fitness Center Branson
Nate Manus graduated from College of the Ozarks last May and soon after joined CoxHealth Fitness Center Branson as a fitness assistant and personal trainer.

“I have always wanted to help people,” Nate explained. “When I first started classes at C of O, I was focused on PreMed.”

When Nate was introduced to physical education opportunities, he quickly found an area that combined his passion for helping people with his passion for fitness.

“I really, really enjoy what I do,” Nate said. “As a personal trainer, I’m able to build relationships with our members and work with them so that they feel better and are able to enjoy life more. They might not always enjoy the workout, but in the end, they always feel better.”

Nate said the first thing he does when he meets a new client is find out about their goals.

“My goal is to help them reach their goals,” he said. “I’ll customize a workout and I talk to them about diet and nutrition.”

In addition to offering personal training, you can also find Nate teaching classes at the fitness center. 

For more information about CoxHealth Fitness Center Branson or to schedule an appointment with Nate, call 348-0060.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Clinic closings for Jan. 21, 2016

CoxHealth Center Ozark
Opens at 10 a.m.

CoxHealth Pediatrics
Opens at 9:30 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Republic
Opens at 9 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Shell Knob
Opens at 9:30 a.m.

CoxHealth Center Rogersville
Staff only - no provider



Branson locations


CoxHealth Orthopedics
Opens at 10 a.m.

CoxHealth Pain and Neurology
Opens at 9 a.m.

CoxHealth Center Branson West
Opens at 10 a.m.

CoxHealth Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine
Opens at 10 a.m.

CoxHealth Center Kimberling City
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Rheumatology
Closed

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Cox Branson to host Meet Your Match for graduating nurses



Many nurses will say going into the healthcare field was an easy decision; however, deciding which area within the healthcare industry to work in was not as clear.

To help make that decision a little easier for graduating students, or nurses considering a career change, Cox Branson will host Meet Your Match on Tuesday, Jan. 26. During Meet Your Match, participants will have an opportunity to learn directly from nursing leaders throughout Cox Branson about the many opportunities available.

“Meet Your Match is like speed dating for those who are interested in entering our internship,” explains Kari Bowling, recruitment specialist. “During Meet Your Match, each participant meets with a department leader for a predetermined amount of time, usually for approximately five minutes, to learn about each area of the hospital and ask questions. By the end of the event, participants will have had the opportunity to meet with all department leaders, and hopefully leave with a clear understanding of what specialty best suits them.”

Bowling explained that Meet Your Match is a fairly new concept and while it aids in recruitment, the main objective is for graduating nurses to meet leaders and learn about the different areas of specialty from people who work in those departments.

“As a result of Meet Your Match events, many participants have applied to areas they didn’t know existed or thought they wouldn’t be interested in,” Bowling says.

Meet Your Match will be held Tuesday, Jan. 26, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Magnolia Room at Cox Branson, 525 Branson Landing Blvd. Arrive early to enjoy refreshments.

For more information, call 417-335-7368 or email kari.bowling@coxhealth.com.


Clinic closings for Jan. 20, 2016



CoxHealth Center Willow Springs
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Republic
Opens at 9 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Campbell
Opens at 1 p.m.


CoxHealth Center Shell Knob
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Family & Occupational Medicine
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Southern Hills
Closed


CoxHealth Center Chesterfield
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Nixa
Late opening/reduced staff


CoxHealth Pediatrics
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Ozark
Opens at 10 a.m.


The Clinic at Walmart (Kansas Expy)
Opens at 12:30 p.m.


CoxHealth Center Seymour
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Marshfield
Opens at 1 p.m. (acute care only)



Branson locations



CoxHealth Orthopedics
Closed


CoxHealth Diabetes & Endo.
Call ahead


CoxHealth Heart Center
Opens at 9:30 a.m.


CoxHealth Pain and Neurology
Opens at 9 a.m.


CoxHealth Family Medicine and OB
Opens at 12 p.m.


CoxHealth Hyperbaric and Wound Care
Opens at 12 p.m.


CoxHealth Family Medicine (Hwy 248)
Opens at 11 a.m.


Mary's Well House
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine 
Opens at 10 a.m.


CoxHealth Center Forsyth
Open


FDC General Surgery
Open


FDC Urology
Open


CoxHealth Center Branson West
Closed


CoxHealth Internal Medicine & Infectious Diseases
Closed


CoxHealth Rheumatology
Closed